News Recap: June 10, 2016

A weekly recap of art world news.

Battle Scene, Aniello Falcone

Battle Scene, Aniello Falcone

Stolen Old Masters Paintings, Missing for Decades, Have Been Found in London Vault
Two stolen 17th century Old Master paintings have been recovered from a London Vault. The paintings were stolen in 1994 from two separate locations in Rome: one from the former Senator and Prime Minister of the Italy, and one from an accountant’s office. In December 2014, a “private individual” matched both paintings in the Art Loss Register database.  ALR researchers traced the works to a storage vault in London, confirming that the works in question are “Battle Scene” by Aniello Falcone and “Concert with four people and a drinker” by Valentin de Boulogne. The owner of the two paintings claims to have had no idea that the works were stolen. Both paintings have been shipped back to Italy and will require restoration to repair the severe damage suffered during the theft.
Read the full story (ArtNet News)

New Owner Revives Calumet’s European Stores
The European investment group AURELIUS announced its acquisition of the well-known photography brands Calumet Photographic and Bowens Lighting. Despite having closed all United States Calumet stores and filing for bankruptcy in March 2014, Calumet’s European locations are still in operation. AURELIUS plans to upgrade Calumet’s current retail stores and open more locations, and will announce new equipment under the Bowens brand.
Read the full story (PetaPixel)

NPR Photographer David Gilkey Klled in Afghanistan
National Public Radio confirmed that 50-year-old photojournalist David Gilkey and his colleague and interpreter 38-year-old Zabihullah Tamanna, were killed in Afghanistan during a Taliban raid on their convoy. Gilkey photographed war and conflict for NPR and was considered one of the best photojournalists in the world, having received a George Polk Award, a national News and Documentary Emmy, and numerous distinctions from the White House News Photographers Association.
Read the full story (NPR)