News Recap: November 30, 2018

A weekly update of art world news.

 Ilse Bing (German, 1899-1998)  Self-portrait, Paris, 1931 , printed later Gelatin silver print, 14x11 inches. San Antonio Museum of Art, gift of Ernest Pomerantz and Marie Brenner, 2012.23.25 ©Estate of Ilse Bing, courtesy Michael Mattis

Ilse Bing (German, 1899-1998) Self-portrait, Paris, 1931, printed later Gelatin silver print, 14x11 inches. San Antonio Museum of Art, gift of Ernest Pomerantz and Marie Brenner, 2012.23.25 ©Estate of Ilse Bing, courtesy Michael Mattis

San Antonio Museum of Art Receives Gift of 850 Photographs
Collectors Marie Brenner and Ernest Pomerantz generously donated 850 photographs from their collection to the San Antonio Museum of Art. The gift consists of 20th century photos, many of them by noted documentary photographers like Henri Cartier-Bresson, Danny Lyon, Joel Meyerowitz, and Stephen Shore. “This gift is an important one for our institution, building both the depth and breadth of our photography collection. These works reflect a crucial period of the 20th century, with more than seven decades of images of both tumultuousness and calm,” said Museum Director Katie Luber. 70 of the donated photos will be featured in an exhibition this February titled “Capturing the Moment: Photographs from the Marie Brenner and Ernest Pomerantz Collection.”
Read the full story (Artnews

France Restitutes 26 Bronzes to Benin
Last Friday a report was issued by the Élysée palace damning France’s sluggish rate of restitution. Since then, 26 bronze artifacts taken from Benin in the colonial era have been returned to the state by France. The French President, Emmanuel Macron, has called on the rest of France’s institutions to begin organizing the returns of wrongfully obtained artifacts. This has been met with some resistance from the institutions with a fear of thinning their collections and opening a “pandora’s box.” The Benin return offers temporary access to the artifacts while France determines a larger blanket restitution law for the entire country.
Read the full story (Artnet

Second Photo of Vincent Van Gogh Debunked
Earlier this year, a photograph was discovered and attributed to the identity of Vincent Van Gogh, making it the second ever photograph discovered of the artist. This week, the Van Gogh Museum has admitted that a photo of Vincent at age 13 is actually his younger brother Theo. The discovery was made after finding that the photographer was based in Brussels, a location Vincent had never been to, but where Theo worked at a gallery. The portrait’s identity has been confirmed by forensic data specialist, Zeno Geradts, at the University of Amsterdam. So, as previously thought, there is just one surviving photo of Vincent Van Gogh, one of him at age 19 in January 1873. The artist is quoted as saying, “I myself still find photographs frightful and don’t like to have any, especially not of people whom I know and love.”
Read the full story (The Art Newspaper)