News Recap: June 29, 2018

A weekly update of art world news.

  Casa de la Muerte, Ciudad de México , 1975. Graciela Iturbide (Mexican, born in 1942). Photograph, gelatin silver print. Museum purchase with funds donated by John and Cynthia Reed, Charles H. Bayley Picture and Painting Fund, Barbara M. Marshall Fund, Lucy Dalbiac Luard Fund, Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Fund for Photography, Francis Welch Fund, and Jane M. Rabb Fund for Film and Photography. © Graciela Iturbide. Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Casa de la Muerte, Ciudad de México, 1975. Graciela Iturbide (Mexican, born in 1942). Photograph, gelatin silver print. Museum purchase with funds donated by John and Cynthia Reed, Charles H. Bayley Picture and Painting Fund, Barbara M. Marshall Fund, Lucy Dalbiac Luard Fund, Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Fund for Photography, Francis Welch Fund, and Jane M. Rabb Fund for Film and Photography. © Graciela Iturbide. Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

MFA Boston Acquires Photographic Works by Graciela Iturbide
The Museum of Fine Art, Boston recently acquired 37 rare prints by Mexican photographer Graciela Iturbide. The collection of Iturbide’s photographs “tell the visual story of Mexico” from 1969-2007, a period of great transition for the country. Kristen Gresh, MFA Boston Curator of Photographs said, “Her work is very important—it really goes beyond documentary photography to express this wonderfully intense personal and poetic vision of her country,” Included in the acquisition are works that documented Mexican Indigenous populations, Frida Kahlo, and Mexican muralism. MFA Boston Director, Matthew Teitelbaum, said in a statement, “Iturbide’s strong images will complement other recent acquisitions and displays of work which explore how cultures intersect and transcend borders.” The photographs will be exhibited with others by the photographer on loan in early 2019.
Read the full story (The Art Newspaper)

South African Photographer David Goldblatt Dies at 87
David Goldblatt, South African photographer, passed away at age 87 on June 25 at his home in Johannesburg. Goldblatt was widely recognized, and his politically fueled, black-and-white photographs were exhibited around the world. His lens began documenting poverty, inequality, the AIDS crisis, and the further effects of colonialism on South Africa in 1948 and continued photographing these subjects well into the new millennium. South Africa’s Goodman Gallery Director, Liza Essers, said, “David’s passing is a significant loss to South Africa and the global art world. A legend, a teacher, a national icon, and a man of absolute integrity has passed.” Later this year Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney will exhibit a major show of Goldblatt’s work.
Read the full story (ArtNews)

Fotografiska to Open a New Photo Center in New York City
Fotografiska, the Swedish photography organization, will expand to New York in 2019 with a new 45,000 square foot center opening on Park Avenue South. The location, in the Flatiron neighborhood, is one of numerous expansions Fotografiska has in the works, including a space in London. The New York center will have a cafe, bookshop, and three-floors of exhibition space where photographers from around the world will show their work.
Read the full story (Artnet)