News Recap: July 13, 2018

A weekly update of art world news.

 Farah Pahlavi and Andy Warhol in Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, 1977 via Wikimedia Commons

Farah Pahlavi and Andy Warhol in Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, 1977 via Wikimedia Commons

Unseen Warhol Photographs to be Released
Later this year, The Andy Warhol Foundation will release thousands of unseen photographs by Andy Warhol. Stanford University recently acquired a collection of over 3,600 contact sheets with photos taken over an 11 year period, from 1976 until Warhol’s death in 1987. The entire collection amounts to over 130,000 photographs, though Warhol only printed about 17% of them. Snapshots of Warhol’s personal life mingle with familiar work in this collection, including images of his romance with Jon Gould, portraits of Jean-Michel Basquiat, and parties with John Lennon. “There was no downtime, the distinction between daily life and artwork is completely obviated by this archive,” said Peggy Phelan, co-founder of the Contact Warhol Project. Phelan and Richard Meyer, professors at Stanford, founded the Contact Warhol project and by the end of 2018, Stanford will put on a curated exhibition of the work, a book about the project will be published, and an online archive will be launched.
Read the full story (Artnet News)

The Prix Pictet Award Celebrates 10 Years
The Prix Pictet, a Swiss photography award of 100,000 francs, one of photography's largest, celebrated its 10th anniversary while at the Rencontre d’Arles photo fest in Arles, France last week. The award, provided by the private Swiss bank Pictet, emphasizes work on environmental issues, with a new theme every year and a half. Stephen Barber, a partner at Pictet, inaugurated the prize in 2008 and said, “It’s evolved in ways we couldn’t have expected or predicted.” Past themes have included topics like “Earth” and “Consumption.” The newest theme? Hope. “Perhaps it’s unexpected,” Mr. Barber said, “But we felt like we could do with a little hope right now.”
Read the full story (The New York Times)

Stock Photo Agencies to Stop Offering Unnatural Animal Photos
Five photo agencies have agreed to stop offering photos of animals in unnatural circumstances at the lobbying of PETA, the animal rights organization. Getty Images, Shutterstock, Dreamstime, Alamy, and Pond5 have all agreed to stop offering photos of animals “taken in studios… or settings in which the animal is there for the purpose of having their photo taken.” PETA’s years of lobbying against the anthropomorphism of animals aims to benefit animals and conservation efforts after studies have found “a correlation between inaccurate portrayals of animals in the media and increased demand to keep wild animals as pets—often by people who aren’t qualified to properly care for them.” Julia Gallucci, primatologist and PETA’s senior corporate liaison said, “The changes the stock image industry is making means we will see a reduction of exploitative images of primates in ads and other media, and it will have a positive impact on primates, on both the individual and species level.”
Read the full story (Artnet News)