Filtering by: Call for Papers

Mar
1
12:00 AM00:00

University of Iowa: Art in Public

Art in Public
Deadline: March 1

The Grant Wood Art Colony of the University of Iowa seeks proposals for 18-minute presentations or panels that utilized a similar timeframe per participant that address the topic of Art in Public.

Public art assumes many forms in the popular imagination; large-scale sculptures dominating urban squares and plazas, mosaics adorning the walls and walkways of municipal transit hubs, murals of local heroes parading across City Hall walls. However, contemporary public art is now mired in cultural bureaucracy. As intermediaries and agencies increasingly assume responsibility for the commission and creation of art on the behalf of public (often municipal) entities, public art has become synonymous with economic redevelopment. In turn, economic development is often a proxy for exclusionary gentrification. Who is this art for? Exactly which public determines the course of art making? Is public art the same thing as art made via participatory processes?

All presentations examining issues of public art and engaged practice will be considered, but we especially welcome those focusing on the role art plays in community building, curricular integration of socially engaged art, and the responsibilities of the artist and the community. To generate some thinking, we offer the following list of possible topics for exploration, but we stress that presentations do not need to address these areas of inquiry:

engaged practice | the role of public art | the responsibilities of the public artist | the responsibilities of the community | community engagement through the arts | the way in which artists respond to contemporary issues | facilitating collective change through art | museum as a public device | the history of public art

We welcome proposals from emerging and established artists, curators, and scholars from a wide range of fields, including, but not limited to the Visual Arts, Performing Arts, Art History, American Studies, Literature, History, Political Science, Agronomy, and others

Proposals should consist of a single PDF or Word file containing the following:

- presenter’s name, email address, and institutional affiliation (if relevant)
- title of presentation format of presentation (lecture, paper, panel, performance)
- brief biographical information of presenter(s) or one-page CV (Please do not send a full CV.)
- abstract of no more than 200 words
- proposal of less than 800 words
- brief bibliography or list of sources (as relevant)
- anticipated AV needs and any other logistical or technical requirements

If you are a student, please indicate if your presentation will be drawn from work in a course or internship, is part of a thesis, or is based on independent research. If submitting a full panel, please include the above information for all presenters on the panel.

Send proposals to:
Grant Wood Symposium 2018 Planning Committee
grantwood@uiowa.edu

Announcement of accepted proposals will be made by email in April.  The full program schedule will be posted to the symposium website by early August.

Please direct questions to Maura Pilcher, Grant Wood Art Colony director.

This day-long symposium will recognize the interplay between publicly engaged artistic practice and current events, and will build on the legacy of Grant Wood. A proponent of public art, Grant Wood headed the Public Works of Art Program (P.W.A.P.), a part of the New Deal, in 1934. The University of Iowa Regionalist artist and native Iowan not only completed several murals that are still extant, but encouraged other artists to create public art through his pedagogy and professional position.

Fees: FREE

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Feb
26
12:00 AM00:00

Burlington Contemporary Art Writing Prize

Burlington Contemporary Art Writing Prize
Deadline: February 26

Jurors: Fiona Banner & Jenni Lomax

The Burlington Contemporary Art Writing Prize seeks to discover talented young writers on contemporary art, with the winner receiving £1,000 and the opportunity to publish a review of a contemporary art exhibition in The Burlington Magazine.

Since its founding in 1903, The Burlington Magazine has always considered the art of the present to be as worthy of study as the art of the past. The Burlington Contemporary Art Writing Prize advances our commitment to the study of contemporary art by encouraging aspiring young writers to engage critically with its forms and concepts. The Prize promotes clear, concise and well-structured writing that is able to navigate sophisticated ideas without recourse to over-complex language.

Contenders – who must be no older than 35 years of age on 26th February 2018 and have published no more than six exhibition reviews – should submit one unpublished review of a contemporary art exhibition, no more than 1,000 words in length with up to three low-resolution images. ‘Contemporary’ is defined as art produced since 2000. The submitted review must be written in English (although the art considered may be international) and emailed as a Word document, clearly stating the name, age, country of residence and occupation of the writer, to editorial@burlington.org.uk.

Each contender will be offered a digital subscription to the Magazine at a specially reduced price, providing unlimited access to the Magazine’s archive as well as all the latest articles and reviews.

Fees: FREE

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Jan
31
12:00 AM00:00

Amsterdam University Press Book Series: Visual & Material Culture 1300-1700

Visual & Material Culture 1300-1700
Deadline: January 31

A forum for innovative research on the role of images and objects in the late medieval and early modern periods, Visual and Material Culture, 1300–1700 publishes monographs and essay collections that combine rigorous investigation with critical inquiry to present new narratives on a wide range of topics, from traditional arts to seemingly ordinary things. Recognizing the fluidity of images, objects, and ideas, this series fosters cross-cultural as well as multi-disciplinary exploration. We consider proposals from across the spectrum of analytic approaches and methodologies.

Fees: FREE

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Jan
23
12:00 AM00:00

Barnard College of Columbia University Journal of Art Criticism: Surface Tension

Barnard College of Columbia University Journal of At Criticism
Deadline: January 23

For our third edition, the Journal of Art Criticism at Barnard seeks submissions of art and art criticism, particularly work that conceptualizes surfaces—material as surface, skin as material, the tactility of surfaces, bodily sensations evoked through surfaces, and surfaces as screens or as tools for masking. The following prompt may guide submissions, though other topics within contemporary art may also be addressed.

In a sociopolitical context that is fraught with tensions both visible and invisible, surfaces play an important role in evoking (or masking) such frictions. The aesthetics and politics of artists’ chosen materials lend layers of meaning to the works they construct. Materials can recall corporeal containers and bodily experiences, or explore relationships between art and objects, a work’s life cycle, a material’s history and objecthood.

In her 2014 publication, Surface: Matters of Aesthetics, Materiality, and Media, Giuliana Bruno argues that materiality is centered in the relations between substances rather than the materials in isolation. Felix Ensslin and Charlotte Klink’s Aesthetics of the Flesh also posits that skin-like surfaces transcend their material conditions toward more spiritual embodiments. Additionally, Petra Lange-Berndt writes on the ways in which “materials obstruct, disrupt, or interfere with social norms, emerging as impure formations and messy, unstable substances.”

What role do surfaces play in a work of art? What tensions arise when one can or cannot touch a work of art? How might internal identities and lived experiences be embodied externally, through tactile materials? How do abstracted representations express what it is like to live in certain bodies? How do artists reveal things that are hidden by surfaces? What is at stake when artists make things that are (in)tangible, or evoke physical sensations? Why do we need the physical?

Fees: FREE

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Jan
15
12:00 AM00:00

The Daguerreian Society Call for Papers

The Daguerrian Society
Deadline: January 15

The Daguerreian Society (Daguerre.org) invites authors to submit original papers that address and advance the understanding and appreciation of 19th century photography. Possible topics include the art, history, social impact, and practice of the daguerreotype and other photographic processes of this period. All submissions will be considered for publication in the 2017 Daguerreian Annual.

Fees: FREE

Prospectus

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Jun
1
12:00 AM00:00

This, That, or Other: Considering the Emerging Trends and Vernacular in Photography

This, That, or Other: Considering the Emerging Trends and Vernacular in Photography
Deadline: June 1

Society for Photographic Education South Central Chapter
Baylor University and Tarleton State University, Waco, TX

3/4 to 1 page abstract, preferably in pdf form. Include title, AV needs, space concerns, and CV for each presenter.

Minimum of 5 images, but no more than 10. Images must be sized to 1200 pixels on the long side at 100 ppi and saved as a jpg as Lastname_#.jpg. If selected, you will be asked to submit a higher quality representative image for the conference program

Fees: Free

Prospectus

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Apr
8
12:00 AM00:00

Fast Forward: Women in Photography - Lithuanian Edition

Fast Forward: Women in Photography - Lithuanian Edition
Deadline: April 8

National Gallery of Art
Vilnius, Lithuania

Building on the success of the Fast Forward conference at Tate Modern in 2015, co-organised by Tate, University for the Creative Arts (UCA) and Photography along with the Archive Research Centre (PARC) at University for the Arts London, Lithuanian Photographers Association announces the 2nd edition of the Fast Forward conference in collaboration with UCA and UAL/PARC to take place at the National Gallery of Art in Vilnius.

Photography has been a political tool as well as a means of artistic expression. Women have used it in various ways including discussions around their rights, their economic and social insecurity, and their representation in culture and society. Through studying women photographers’ lives, celebrating their creative achievements and contribution to international photographic history, we can discover important insights and inspiration for current issues and discussions generated by global political forces, and also become aware of the obstacles women photographers have to overcome as they have pursued their work.

We are interested in papers which span the entire history of photography, from the 19th century to the present day, which also encompass photography’s different methodologies, from art practice to commercial /industrial work.

One of the foci of this Fast Forward edition is to enable opportunities for researchers to present to an international audience new knowledge about the role of women photographers in the cultural, social and political life of the Baltic States and Eastern Europe – which have a rich academic discourse and vibrant artistic culture combining specific national features with particular local experiences and Western ideas.

We are also interested to present research into, as well as practitioner accounts of, the experiences of women photographers in parts of the world that are as yet unfamiliar within a US/European photo historical context. We welcome proposals for artist-led presentations and panels.

In this conference in Lithuania, we aim to bring international and regional researchers together in order to share knowledge and consider our potential relationships and networks. This 2nd edition of the Fast Forward conference aims to embrace and celebrate the contributions of women photographers to both art and commerce, regionally and globally, and to engage in pertinent debate that will influence new academic discourse and provide further context for the study and practice of photography.

This conference has a special interest in women photographers from the Baltic States, but is not limited to this region. We also welcome abstracts which explore women’s photography throughout the world and across history, and which provide insight into the breadth and complexity of women’s history within photography as practitioners, curators, writers or organizers.

 

Prospectus

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Mar
1
12:00 AM00:00

Society for Photographic Education: Exposure Journal

Exposure Vol. 50: 2
Deadline: March 1

The Exposure journal is now accepting targeted submissions for the Fall 2017 issue on the theme of INFLUENCE. How do influences affect the work we make, the ideas we build upon, the way we teach our students how to think and how to make images? What constitutes productive influence? Is there such a thing as bad or dangerous influence in art making? What kinds of influences occur with artists and thinkers that work in photography that are outside the sphere of the genre? How does what is happening in photography meaningfully influence people working in disciplines seemingly removed from photography? How does influence build upon itself in a creative practice, or, conversely, how does it sometimes generate its opposite?

In the history of SPE and the Exposure journal, there was no larger influence than that of our founder, Nathan Lyons. The SPE family has mourned the passing of this legendary and most influential of figures, and the Fall 2017 issue of the journal will contain features that examine the scope and enduring legacy of his influence, especially as regards his work as an educator, curator and arts activist. If you have material or a proposal related to Nathan Lyons' work and life, please contact the editor.

The above represents just a small sample of possibilities on this theme. Essays, conversations, meditations, reviews and portfolios that examine the topic of Influence will all be considered for publication. Please DO NOT send submissions on subjects unrelated to the stated theme. Work submitted prior to January 30, 2017 will be given priority consideration for publication.

Fees: FREE

Prospectus

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Feb
15
12:00 AM00:00

Center for Documentary Studies Essay Prize

Center for Documentary Studies Essay Prize
Deadline: February 15

Center for Documentary Studies
Durham, NC

The CDS Documentary Essay Prize honors the best in documentary photography and writing in alternating years: one year, photos; one year, writing. The focus is on current or recently completed work (within the last two years) from a long-term project—fifteen images; fifteen to twenty pages of writing.

The upcoming prize competition will be for writing. The winner of the competition receives $3,000 and and feature stories in Center for Documentary Studies’ print and digital publications. The winner’s work is also placed in the Archive of Documentary Arts at the Rubenstein Library, Duke University.

Prospectus

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Dec
16
12:00 AM00:00

Call for Papers: Salted Paper Prints

Salted Paper Prints
Deadline: December 16

Weissman Preservation Center at Harvard Library and the Foundation for the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works
Middlebury, VT

The Weissman Preservation Center at Harvard Library and the Foundation for the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) will present a multi-disciplinary, two-day program that focuses on the preservation, characterization, use, and interpretation of the salt print process, now over 175 years old. Scholarly presentations will include the technical history of the salt print process (both positive and negative images), historical applications of the process for copying and disseminating information, and innovative materials analysis.

The salted paper print process, publicly announced by William Henry Fox Talbot in 1839, became the first negative-to-positive photographic technique. The ability to make photographic multiples revolutionized the way information was recorded and disseminated in the mid-19th century. These photographs represent records of the scholarly, social, and artistic endeavors of the time and play an important role in educational research across disciplines.

While many salt prints have survived as beautifully preserved images with rich tonal ranges, they can also be prone to fading and color shifts. New conservation research has assisted our understanding of these fragile items, and renewed interest in the historical and artistic aspects of salt prints has paralleled this preservation research.

Prospectus

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