News Recap: January 4, 2019

A weekly update of art world news. 

A still from the video for Apeshit, featuring the Consecration of the Emperor Napoleon and the Coronation of Empress Joséphine (1804), by Jacques-Louis David. Photograph: Youtube

A still from the video for Apeshit, featuring the Consecration of the Emperor Napoleon and the Coronation of Empress Joséphine (1804), by Jacques-Louis David. Photograph: Youtube

Louvre Museum Breaks Visitor Record
The Louvre attendance had been on the decline since the 2015 Paris terrorist attacks. However, since June 2018, the Louvre has reported sky rocketing attendance, hitting an annual all time high visitor record of 10.2 million. This dramatic 25% increase can be attributed in part to The Carters’s (Beyoncé and Jay Z) music video for “Apeshit,” which was filmed in the Louvre and featured many of the museum’s most famous pieces. Since the video’s release, the museum has experienced a major influx of visitors looking to photograph in the same locations and has increased their percentage of attendees under 30 years of age to over 50%.
Read the full story (The Guardian)

New Space Imaging Technology Produces Image from 4.1 Billion Miles Away
Just in time for the New Year, an image has returned from NASA’s New Horizon spacecraft of what appears as a massive “snowman” floating in space. This image is a new feat in interstellar photography, having been photographed 4.1 billion miles from Earth in the outer edges of our solar system. At this great distance, only a tiny portion of image information is able to reach back to Earth in a ten hour period. At that rate, it is estimated that the image’s best resolution will be reached in February. The NASA team leading this $800 million traverse received a five-minute standing ovation
Read the full story (Science Magazine)

Nicola L., Feminist Pop Artist, Dies at 81
Multitalented feminist pop artist Nicola L. died on December 31. Her most famous works involved body politics and a surreal, often disjointed take on the human body. She began her career as a painter, graduating from the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris. In 1965, L. burned all of her paintings and began a new artistic direction involving depictions of the female body often made from fabric, vinyl, plastics, and wood from the 1960s and 70s.
Read the full story (Art News)