News Recap: July 5, 2019

A weekly update of art world news.

Diego Velázquez,  Portrait of Olimpia Maidalchini Pamphilj (1591-1657), half length, wearing black  Photo by Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images for Sotheby's. Courtesy Sotheby's.

Diego Velázquez, Portrait of Olimpia Maidalchini Pamphilj (1591-1657), half length, wearing black Photo by Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images for Sotheby's. Courtesy Sotheby's.

Long-Lost Velázquez Painting Breaks Old Masters Auction Record
The recently rediscovered Velázquez portrait of Olimpia Maidalchini Pamphilj sold as Sotheby’s in London for just over $3 million. The long-lost portrait of the “Mistress of the Vatican,” the most powerful woman in Rome who exerted influence over her brother-in-law (and reputed lover), Pope Innocent X. The painting was once in the collection of Don Gaspar Mendez de Haro y Guzmán and was lost for 300 years before it appeared, unattributed, in an auction in the 1980s. Experts at Sotheby’s Amsterdam office identified it as a Velázquez by mysterious markings on the back.
Read the full story (ArtNet News)

AIPAD and Paris Photo Join Forces at Pier 94
Since 1979, the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD) has presented The Photography Show annually in New York City. This spring, AIPAD will join with Paris Photo, the world’s largest international art fair dedicated to photography, to launch Paris Photo New York, Presented with AIPAD. The new fair will be held at Pier 94 April 2-5, 2020 and will be overseen by Florence Bourgeois and Christoph Wiesner, the director and artistic director of Paris Photo, respectively.
Read the full story (ARTnews)

Judge Rules in Favor of Andy Warhol in Photographer’s Copyright Lawsuit
A Manhattan District Court ruled in favor of the Andy Warhol Foundation and against photographer Lynn Goldsmith, who had alleged infringement of copyright. The court held that Warhol’s silkscreen portraits of Prince created for Vanity Fair by altering Goldsmith’s portrait qualifies as fair use. In 1984, Vanity Fair licensed Goldsmith’s portrait for $400 and gave it to Warhol to create a set of 16 artworks for publication. Judge Koeltl ruled that Warhol’s versions of the photograph had completely transformed the meaning of Goldsmith’s original image.
Read the full story (PetaPixel)