News Recap: November 21, 2014

George Hackney/Ulster Museum

George Hackney/Ulster Museum

Newly Discovered Photographs of World War I
A recent BBC documentary, The Man Who Shot the Great War, tells the story of Lance Corporal George Hackney who illegally documented the war from locations on the Western Front. His photographs offer a new perspective on "The Great War."
Read the full story (BBC)

 
Photo from Wikipedia

Photo from Wikipedia

New Whitney Museum Building Will Open in May
Whitney Museum director Adam D. Weinberg announced on Wednesday that the museum’s new building in Manhattan’s meatpacking district is scheduled to open on May 1, 2015. Designed by Renzo Piano, the new building at 99 Ganesvoort Street will have both indoor and outdoor galleries for twice the exhibition space of its previous location. The old Breuer building is slated to become a satellite of The Met for eight years starting in 2016.
Read the full story (New York Times)

 

U.S. Copyright Victory for Haitian Photographer
After a four-year fight over copyright infringement, Haitian photographer Daniel Morel has won his case. The suit involved eight photographs originally sent out over social media, and subsequently distributed to major news outlets. A New York jury found Agence France-Presse and Getty Images responsible for willfully infringing upon Morel’s copyright.
Read the full story (New York Times Lens Blog)

 
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The Smithsonian Plans $2 Billion Remodel
At 168 years old, The Smithsonian Institution is in need of an upgrade. For a mere $2 billion, it will upgrade its many museums and gardens. Renovations will take place from 2016-2036 and will include the revitalization of the Castle, the construction of a new green space, and many other restorations.
Read the full story (Hyperallergic)

Crowd-funding Roundup: The Reimagined 4x5 Camera

Crowd-funding is becoming increasingly popular among creatives. With more sites springing up and more artists asking for funds, Don’t Take Pictures presents a monthly roundup of some projects we find exciting. 

This month’s crowd funding roundup presents a new and affordable large format camera. 

The Intrepid 4x5 Camera

The large format camera holds an important place in photographic history. From the outset these large, heavy cameras were used to render photographs onto glass plates. Though camera technology has changed substantially since photography’s invention, the large format camera has continued to attract a new following of passionate photographers in search of creative freedom and large, detailed negatives. Despite its popularity, the cameras remain heavy and expensive. The folks at The Intrepid Camera Co. have redesigned the conventional 4x5 camera to create a simple to use, lightweight, and compact new product that may pave the way for new photographers to turn off their sensors and take a peek under the darkcloth.

Made from birch plywood and aluminum supports and hinges, the lightweight camera body rings in around 1.2kg. It remains compatible with standard film holders and tripod mounts, and it uses a 75-300mm lens in Linhof/Technika style and lens boards, but note that lenses are note included. Unlike its bulky predecessors, The Intrepid collapses down to 190mmx190mmx120mm for easy transport. For a bit of pizzazz, the bellows are available in black, blue, red, or green. 

The rewards are great at all levels, offering field notebooks for photographers on location, the camera itself with your choice of bellows colors and complete with a pinhole lens, and personalized engraving options. With more funding, Intrepid will be able to expand their product line to include 8x10 cameras and film holders.

Read more about The Intrepid Camera Co. on their Kickstarter page.

This is the last day to fund this project.

Do you know of a crowd-funding project that benefits the art community? Let us know at info@donttakepictures.com

Rule Breakers: Charles Rozier

“I never want to see another picture of ________.” Industry veterans share their pet peeves on themes in contemporary photography. In this series they present their “rule” along with five photographs that break the rule in an effort to show that great work is the exception to the rule."

Rule Setter: Hamidah Glasgow, Executive Director of The Center for Fine Art Photography
Rule Breaker: Charles Rozier

I never want to see another picture of a photographer’s family member staring blankly off into the distance. Yet, I am and have been, mesmerized by Charles Rozier’s image, “George, morning 2008.” This image sits above my desk at the office and on my bedroom wall at home. I can’t seem to get enough of George and his complex, lined, and thoughtful face. The random left over cereal in his bowl on the table in front of him leads the viewer to think that he has been sitting this way for a very long time. His grip on the coffee cup is steady and firm. The stacks of paper on the table in front of George suggest a sustained intellectual pursuit or perhaps a passionate musical affiliation. Either way, he is unaware of us and I suspect is comfortable in a world away from this one. Rozier’s series, House Music, is a prolonged study of a family and the ins and outs of family life. He has documented his family for 20+ years, allows us to experience the passage of time, the aging process, and for George, we experience the good and bad times. This series, which will eventually be a book, is much like being a part of this family and waiting for the reunion so that we can see how everyone is doing.

—Hamidah Glasgow

George, morning (2008)

George, morning (2008)

Anna (2009)

Anna (2009)

Harry, Helena, George (2009)

Harry, Helena, George (2009)

Molly, Anna (2012)

Molly, Anna (2012)

Anna, clips (2004)

Anna, clips (2004)

News Recap: November 14, 2014

Weekly recap of art world news.

©Robert Longo. Courtesy in camera galerie

©Robert Longo. Courtesy in camera galerie

Paris Photo 2014
The 18th edition of Paris Photo opened this week and will run through November 16. This year's fair boasts 169 galleries and artbook dealers. Paris Photo is the premier international art fair for photographic work. Special events and lectures will be held on the history of the photobook, collecting, and interview with notable figures in the international art community.
Read more (Paris Photo)

 

Unlimited Photo Storage for Amazon  Prime Members
"Amazon Prime has long been a go-to service for streamers and shoppers alike. But today, the service has become a great deal more enticing to photographers with the announcement of Amazon Prime Photos: a could-based service that will allow you to store unlimited photographs on Amazon's massive cloud platform without having to pay a cent on top of your regular Prime membership. The new service — which is available for Android, iOS, Windows and through the browser — will allow you to sync and access your full-res photo archive from anywhere in the world."—Gannon Burgett
Read the full story (Peta Pixel)

 

$250M Art Heist Was an Inside Job
"Corruption is on the rise in Turkey, and the State Art and Sculpture Museum in Ankara is no exception. A new report in the newspaper Hurriyet has revealed that museum staff participated in a $250 million art heist of 302 works in their own institution between 2005 and 2009."—Laura C. Mallonee
Read the full story (Hyperallergic)

 
© Ferdinando Scianna

© Ferdinando Scianna

Magnum Photographers Release Never-Before-Seen Photos
A few months ago, Magnum photographers challenged each other to dive into the depths of their archives for a single photograph—one that they have always liked, but for some reason or another, has gone unpublished and/or unnoticed. Photographers explored their attics, basements, and hard drives looking for an image to rescue from oblivion. Until November 14 at 5pm EST, these photos are available as signed, $100 Magnum Square Prints.
Read the full story (Magnum)